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The California Voter Foundation's

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Statewide Officers' 2002 Progress Statements

In 1998, the California Voter Foundation asked all candidates for statewide office to tell voters, through our web site, what their top three priorities would be if elected to office.

For the 2002 election, CVF has invited all elected statewide officers to submit "progress statements" to tell voters, in 500 words or less,what they've done to advance their top three priorities from the 1998 election. Half the statewide officers have already provided progress statements; CVF will add new progress statements to this site when they are submitted.

Five of California's eight statewide officers are on the ballot this year. Their record over the past four years in office is an important tool for voters to use when deciding how to vote.

Statewide officers' progress statements are not edited and are published without any analysis or commentary. CVF's goal with this project is to utilize the Internet to create the essential "raw materials" needed for citizens to make informed decisions during elections and to hold elected leaders accountable after the elections are over.

CVF encourages voters and the news media alike to carefully scrutinize these statements and do further research in order to evaluate statewide officers' performance and whether they kept their campaign promises. CVF's California Online Voter Guide has much more information, news and analysis about all the candidates for statewide office.

While some may see this project as giving extra exposure to incumbents, it's important to remember that those who hold office have a record that is open to public inspection, which can be a campaigning asset as well as a drawback. And all California candidates, incumbents and challengers alike, are given equal exposure in CVF's online voter guide.

CVF's Archive of Campaign Promises project is made possible through a grant from The James Irvine Foundation.
 
Gray Davis, Governor


Cruz Bustamante, Lt. Governor


Bill Jones, Secretary of State


Kathleen Connell, Controller


Phil Angelides, Treasurer


Bill Lockyer, Attorney General


Delaine Eastin, Superintendent of Public Instruction


Insurance Commissioner

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Archive of Campaign Promises homepage
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Gray Davis
Governor

Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Restore our public schools to greatness by raising our expectations of students, increasing funding and requiring more parent-teacher-student interaction.

2. Implement HMO reforms to protect the rights of all patients.

3. Develop an inclusive administration to unite California's diverse population.

2002 Progress Statement

1. Restore our public schools to greatness by raising our expectations of students, increasing funding and requiring more parent-teacher-student interaction.

When I was elected Governor in 1998, I promised to move California forward. Over the past three years, I've worked hard to make a difference in people's lives. And we have made substantial progress on education, healthcare and bringing Californians together.

As Governor, I've made education my top priority and have led an ambitious reform effort to improve our public schools. We've demanded more accountability and provided more resources - increasing spending on schools by 30 percent. And student achievement scores are up three years in a row. There's more to do, but I am determined to do everything within our means to recapture California's rightful place at the head of the class.

One way we've improved our schools is though enhanced teacher recruitment and training - and rewards for better student performance. Two years ago in my State of the State address, I issued a "call to arms" for teachers to meet California's growing population of school-age kids. I wanted to change young people's perception of teaching so they again see it as a great and noble profession.

Since then, 15,000 new teachers have been recruited for our public schools and 20,000 college students have taken advantage of incentives to become future teachers. More than 100,000 current teachers have received rigorous advanced training at the University of California. More than 1,300 teachers have met the high national standards for prestigious National Board certification - a 10-fold increase in three years.

My commitment to educational excellence extends to higher education as well. I have launched new programs to extend access and increase accountability in California's public colleges and universities. Last year, I signed into law a $1.2 billion program guaranteeing financial aid to any student who maintains a B average in high school - the largest merit-based student-aid system in the country.

2. Implement HMO reforms to protect the rights of all patients.

Since I took office, California has led the nation in HMO reform. Nearly a quarter million Californians have been served by our new Department of Managed Health Care - the first such patient protection agency in any state. With the help of that Department, 40,000 Californians have taken on their HMO's -- and won. They received the treatment their HMO denied - without having to go to court.

3. Develop an inclusive administration to unite California's diverse population.

During my inaugural address, I promised to end the era of wedge-issue politics and bring Californians together. Since then, I have opened a new era in California-Mexico relations though cultural and economic exchanges that have benefited all Californians. My Administration reflects the great diversity and talent our State has to offer - including many "firsts," such as the first woman to serve as chief of staff, the first African-American to serve as secretary of Health and Human Services and the first Latina and Asian Pacific American to cabinet positions.

My friends, California has challenges ahead - but also a bright future. I would be honored to continue serving you as your Governor.


Learn more about the Governor | Learn more about the race for Governor

   
 

Cruz Bustamante
Lieutenant Governor

Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Creating jobs by increasing California's international trade, particularly with Mexico.

2. Making college more affordable for working families and ensuring stable funding for U.C and C.S.U.

3. Protecting environmental/economic resources like Lake Tahoe, the same way I protected the coast as Speaker.

2002 Progress Statement

It's the character of the person that determines the character of the elected office, not the other way around. Because I grew up in a working class family, I have given the same work ethic to the job of Lieutenant Governor. I have used my position to work on issues benefiting all Californians, which include:

1. Creating jobs by increasing California's international trade, particularly with Mexico.

Helping increase trade and job opportunities -- I have met with business representatives from California's major trading partners. I hosted an international economic development conference with the Governor of Jalisco, Mexico; and organized a business meeting with President Vicente Fox and California leaders to promote jobs on both sides of the border.

2. Making college more affordable for working families and ensuring stable funding for U.C and C.S.U.

Working to make college more accessible and affordable for all Californians -- I launched the College Opportunity Outreach Program to promote public awareness of the $1.2 billion Cal Grant guarantee program that gives thousands of working and middle class high school graduates unprecedented opportunities to attend college. As a UC Regent and a CSU Trustee, I fought to keep student fees low.

3. Protecting environmental/economic resources like Lake Tahoe, the same way I protected the coast as Speaker.

Protecting California's coast and waterways -- As Chair of the California State Lands Commission, I ordered an inspection of all facilities on public trust land for MTBE leaks, requiring all deficiencies to be immediately corrected; and, established a "zero tolerance" oil spill policy, ordering an oil platform shutdown for safety violations. I have worked to defeat "Rigs to Reef" legislation - which would have allowed oil companies to abandon oil drilling equipment and related debris in our oceans, and continued to fight against offshore drilling along California's coast.

Other

Filed a taxpayer lawsuit against energy "gougers" -- I filed a lawsuit against five out-of-state energy producers who I believe illegally manipulated the market and overcharged Californians billions of dollars. I have also sponsored legislation to make "market manipulation" a felony -- just like "armed robbery".

Ensuring California's fair share in federal funding -- I led state and federal efforts to ensure a complete count in the 2000 Census, resulting in an additional Congressional seat and guaranteeing billions in federal funds for California roads and schools.

Encouraging diversity and tolerance -- I developed the Commission for One California to promote dialogue around issues of race, tolerance, and diversity. Among other projects, the Commission spearheaded the distribution of 10,000 educational kits concerning the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II to California schools and libraries

Promoting a quality of life for Californians -- As Co-Chair of rebuilding California for the 21st Century, I am a leader in the campaigns to pass Proposition 42 which will dedicate the sales tax on gasoline for better roads and transportation - and Proposition 40, the $2.6 billion dollar bond that will provide funds to clean up our beaches and secure more park and open space.

Fighting Breast Cancer -- I developed the Contract to Fight Breast Cancer - the largest employer based program to promote breast cancer screenings in America. The Contract covers over one million employees.

I look forward to the opportunity of four more years of hard work on behalf of all Californians.


Learn more about the Lt. Governor | Learn more about the race for Lt. Governor

   
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Bill Jones
Secretary of State


Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Work for 100% participation in elections by all eligible voters with zero tolerance for voter fraud

2. Implement campaign reform including contribution limits and candidate reports on the internet

3. Reform California's election system using innovative technology

2002 Progress Statement

1. Work for 100% participation in elections by all eligible voters with zero tolerance for voter fraud

Building on the success of my first term, we have expanded the nation's most extensive voter outreach efforts to provide convenient registration and voting opportunities to Californians where they live, work, play and go to school. We recently established the nationally acclaimed Vote America project (http://voteamerica.ca.gov) which seeks to capitalize on America's patriotic spirit to strengthen our nation through increased participation in our democracy. Our work has been recognized by the National Association of Secretaries of State and numerous media outlets.

Our election fraud investigation unit continues to guarantee the sanctity of the vote by investigating allegations of election misconduct and referring lawbreakers to District Attorneys for prosecution.

In addition to sending fraud cases to local prosecutors, our office has also reviewed the conduct of elections in cities and counties such as San Francisco, the City of South Gate and other areas around the state. In several instances, we have initiated additional investigations, required reports to our office, ordered specific actions by election jurisdictions where problems have been identified and offered reforms to prevent problems from recurring.

2. Implement campaign reform including contribution limits and candidate reports on the internet

California is now home to one of the most detailed and extensive on-line databases of campaign finance information in the nation thanks to the work of our office during my last term as Secretary of State.

During my first term in office, we strongly encouraged the Legislature to require the electronic filing of campaign finance reports by candidates, political action committees, lobbyists and major donors so the information could be posted on the Internet. Once the Legislature and Governor finally approved the measure we sponsored, we established one of the most detailed campaign finance reporting systems anywhere on the Internet at http://cal-access.ss.ca.gov . We are continuing to update and modernize our campaign finance disclosure web site every day, regularly adding new features to help voters and researchers access the information they need.

To implement campaign contribution limits, we encouraged the Legislature to place Proposition 34 on the ballot, which was then approved by California voters. Unfortunately, Governor Davis only agreed to sign the measure once the Legislature agreed to exempt candidates for statewide office from the contribution limits until after the Governor concludes his campaign for a second term - allowing incumbent state officers the ability to collect unlimited campaign contributions even though candidates for legislative office are already subject to the voter-approved contribution limits.

3. Reform California's election system using innovative technology

Even before the election fiasco that hit Florida in November 2000, our office had decertified dozens of archaic voting systems and approved new touch-screen voting technology for use by counties. In 2000, Riverside County became the largest election jurisdiction in the nation to fully transition to new state-of-the-art touch-screen voting computers in all of their voting precincts.

In addition to approving new technologies and encouraging their adoption, I recently ordered all California counties to replace outdated chad-prone punch-card voting systems with more advanced technology, and sponsored the Voting Modernization Bond Act of 2002 (Proposition 41) to provide counties with the resources they will need to purchase new voting equipment.

In November 2000, I developed and implemented a 10-Point Election Reform Plan that has been used as a model for election experts and states across the country.


Learn more about the Secretary of State | Learn more about the race for Secretary of State

   
 

Kathleen Connell
Controller

Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Continue to root out fraud and waste in state government.

2. Conduct strict performance audits to save money that can be better spent on improving education.

3. Protect the pension benefits of retirees who depend on state pension funds.

2002 Progress Statement

1. Continue to root out fraud and waste in state government

Audits performed by my office have identified more than $2 billion in savings for state and local programs since I became State Controller in 1995.

More than $650 million in savings was identified through our audits documenting fraud and abuse by Medi-Cal providers. I initiated a partnership with the FBI to pursue criminal investigations and sponsored state legislation to prevent fraud and abuse from occurring in the future.

In addition, I was the first to identify problems with financing proposals to address California's energy crisis. As predicted, long-term energy contracts have been more costly than anticipated and delays in energy bond sales have increased interest costs to the state.

2. Conduct strict performance audits to save money that can be better spent on improving education

When I was first elected, I conducted a performance audit on the Controller's Office. This resulted in nearly $47 million in operational savings and a 15% reduction in staff.

I also sponsored legislation to implement performance-based auditing throughout state government so these standards of efficiency could be applied system-wide. While the legislature failed to pass the legislation, I used my position as a member of the Franchise Tax Board and the Board of Equalization to initiate performance audits to improve operations of the two largest revenue-producing agencies in the state.

I am currently sponsoring legislation to implement zero-based budgeting, a performance-based budgeting system that would make government accountable for every dollar that it spends. This budgeting system is necessary in light of the tremendous growth in expenditures government has seen without a similar growth in revenues.

3. Protect the pension benefits of retirees who depend on state pension funds

As Controller, I sit on the boards of the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teachers' Retirement System (CalSTRS), two of the three largest pension funds in the United States. I have worked to maximize the return on investments to achieve the best possible result for retirees. I have increased the value of the funds by moving to diversify investments. I successfully urged both boards to increase participation in alternative investments, such as the biotech industry and under-served California urban areas. The boards also adopted my affordable housing proposal, which will result in a projected rate of return greater than 20% for the fund, while also increasing the availability of low-cost housing. These proposals have created a stronger, more diverse portfolio.

I have kept administrative costs low by consistently voting against unnecessary budget and salary increases. I voted to implement competitive bidding for vendors and to reform travel policies and eliminate perks for board members and retirement staff.

I have protected retirees, by voting to keep retirees' medical premiums and co-payments as low as possible, and I led the effort to expand medical coverage for retired educators. In addition, I supported increases in retirement benefits for both funds utilizing the increased returns on investments.

Both boards recently adopted my proposals to safeguard the retirement savings of employees working for companies in which PERS and STRS invest. These proposals will protect against problems such as those recently encountered by employees and retirees of Enron.


Learn more about the Controller | Learn more about the race for Controller

   
 


Phil Angelides
Treasurer


Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Protect taxpayers' dollars, investing prudently and managing efficiently.

2. Cost-effectively finance schools and other public facilities; Broaden opportunities for California families to invest and save for their future.

3. Increase state fund investment in California, creating economic growth, jobs and opportunity.

2002 Progress Statement

When I ran for Treasurer in 1998, I pledged to use my private sector financial management experience to protect taxpayer dollars, cost-effectively finance schools and other public facilities, and increase investment in California communities. Following are some of the many accomplishments made, during my first term of office, toward fulfilling this pledge. More detailed information regarding the activities of the State Treasurer's Office may be found at www.treasurer.ca.gov.

1. Protect taxpayer dollars

As Treasurer, I have taken unprecedented actions to stop abuse of the state's bond laws, achieved solid investment results, and prudently invested taxpayer funds in California communities.

Since 1999, my office has put more taxpayer money to work here in California by increasing state deposits in community banks by over $3 billion and by investing in loans made to purchase homes and build businesses in California communities. Deposits in community banks have assured yields above the Treasury Bill rate, and are protected through full collateralization. Investments in home and business lending have also provided competitive yields for taxpayers while helping to build California communities.

Shortly after taking office, I joined with the State Attorney General to take successful legal action to halt abuse of the state's bond financing laws, thereby protecting investors and preserving the integrity of the municipal bond market.

2. Cost-effectively finance schools and other public facilities

In 1999, my office released Smart Investments, outlining a strategic and fiscally prudent approach to investment and calling for state infrastructure investments that support livable communities, sustainable development, and sound environment practices. Following up on Smart Investments, my office successfully advocated setting new criteria for allocating program resources administered by boards and authorities upon which the State Treasurer serves. For example, low-interest loans for local infrastructure projects are now awarded by the California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank according to criteria that reward projects that meet Smart Investment goals.

In addition to cost-effectively financing billions of dollars in schools, parks and other public facilities, my office also launched the Smart Bonds program to help school districts finance their facility needs at better terms than otherwise might be available to a district on its own.

3. Investing in California communitites

In 2000, my office launched a major public policy initiative, The Double Bottom Line: Investing in California's Emerging Markets, which has directed over $12 billion in investment capital - through state programs and the State's pension and investment funds - to spur economic growth in California communities. Double Bottom Line investments and programs launched since release of the policy initiative include:

  • $475 million investment fund targeted to expand businesses and jobs in underserved communities
  • $50 million in additional funding for Community Health Clinics
  • Increased funding for affordable housing, pollution control, job creation and student lending
  • Enactment of a new law requiring public funds to be deposited in financial institutions committed to community reinvestment
  • The Extra Credit Teacher Home Purchase Program, which provides low interest loans and down payment assistance to help teachers, who commit to serve in the toughest schools, purchase a home

Other Notable Accomplishments

  • Launched California's tax advantaged college savings program - California ScholarShare, which now has over 60,000 California families enrolled
  • Sponsored legislation to create the California Consumer Power and Conservation Financing Authority to ensure reliability of energy supplies and to finance energy conservation and renewable energy


Learn more about the Treasurer | Learn more about the race for Treasurer

   
 


Bill Lockyer
Attorney General


Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Uphold the assault weapons ban and outlaw junk guns.

2. Restore environmental, consumer protection, civil rights enforcement.

3. 236,000 felony arrest warrants are unserved in California. Murderers, wife-beaters, child molesters, rapists. I'll make sure the AG's computers catch criminals, not let them go.

2002 Progress Statement

1. Uphold the assault weapons ban and outlaw junk guns.

Lockyer created a special Firearms Division within the Department of Justice that is vigorously enforcing California's assault weapons ban and mandatory trigger-locks law.

Lockyer's office has taken thousands of junk-guns out of circulation and prevented more than 10,000 criminals from purchasing a gun since 1999.

2. Restore environmental, consumer protection, civil rights enforcement.

Lockyer fought for new resources to restore enforcement of environmental, consumer protection, and civil rights laws:

Environment

During Lockyer's first week as Attorney General, he filed and won a lawsuit to protect Lake Tahoe from MTBE contamination and is working with the Governor to ban MTBE in California.

Attorney General Lockyer successfully challenged the Bush Administration's proposed extension of 36 oil and gas leases off the California coast. The federal government and oil companies recently appealed, and litigation is ongoing.

Lockyer is defending President Clinton's creation of the historic Sequoia National Monument from attack by the Bush Administration. The monument permanently protects California's last remaining Giant Sequoia groves and surrounding ecosystems.

Lockyer filed written objections to the Bush Administration's plan to roll back federal Clean Air Act standards applicable to the nation's biggest stationary sources of air pollution: fossil fuel-powered electrical power plants and refineries.

Civil Rights

Immediately after his election, Attorney General Lockyer reestablished the Civil Rights Enforcement Section in his office and he fought for and won the funding necessary to make the unit one of the largest, most aggressive in the country. The section continues to enforce state civil rights laws as well as prevent discrimination in housing and employment through vigorous prosecution of law breakers.

Lockyer established an Office of Immigrant Assistance to provide education and outreach for California's immigrant communities and victims of consumer fraud schemes.

After the terrorist attacks, Attorney General Lockyer rallied local law enforcement and other community leaders to speak out against senseless acts of violence and hate directed at Muslim Americans, Sikh Americans and other ethnic minorities.

Consumer Protection

Lockyer was the sponsor of California's landmark "Do Not Call" law, which gives consumers the power to stop telemarketing harassment. The Department of Justice will compile the list, scheduled to be available next year.

When California energy prices spiked, putting small companies out of business and devastating low-income families, Lockyer formed a legal team to investigate illegal market manipulation by power companies. Lockyer filed suit against PG&E Corp. for siphoning off over $4 billion from its California utility before it went bankrupt, leaving California consumers holding the bag.

Lockyer has recovered hundreds of millions of dollars for California consumers who have been defrauded by illegal business practices.

3. 236,000 felony arrest warrants are unserved in California. Murderers, wife-beaters, child molesters, rapists. I'll make sure the AG's computers catch criminals, not let them go.

The year he took office, Lockyer introduced legislation that successfully implemented important reforms:

  • Established a top ten warrant list for every California county to prioritize apprehension of dangerous suspects.
  • Made it easier for local law enforcement to report warrants to the state warrant database used by law enforcement agencies throughout the state.
  • Provided law enforcement access to addresses maintained by other state agencies, such as the Franchise Tax Board.


Learn more about the Attorney General | Learn more about the race for Attorney General

   
 

Delaine Eastin
Superintendent of Public Instruction

Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. School Accountability -- We need to implement an accountability system to ensure all students meet, or make progress towards, our new statewide standards.

2. School Funding -- We need to raise school funding up to the national average and give our kids the schools they deserve.

3. Smaller Classes -- We need to continue reducing class sizes.

2002 Progress Statement

In 1998 I stated that my three top priorities for education were school accountability, school funding, and smaller classes. While no one person can claim credit for improvements, I think we have made progress in all three areas. At the same time, more certainly remains to be done if we want all California students to have the quality education system they deserve.

1. School Accountability -- We need to implement an accountability system to ensure all students meet, or make progress towards, our new statewide standards.

We have made significant strides in implementing a statewide school accountability program for California. We have developed statewide content standards, and we are linking assessment and accountability to these standards. Under my direction, the California Department of Education has implemented the Public Schools Accountability Act (PSAA) of 1999, which holds schools accountable for improving students' academic performance. It establishes an incentive system to provide awards for schools that demonstrate growth, as well as interventions and, ultimately, sanctions for some continuously underperforming schools.

As part of the PSAA, we have also developed an Academic Performance Index (API) to measure schools' performance. The index is calculated as a composite score for a school and consists of various indicators. While test results currently account for much of the API, other indicators are being phased in over time, including attendance and graduation rates.

Schools receive both an API score and a ranking, as well as growth targets against which performance is judged. Although the accountability program is still in its early stages, it is off to a good start, and families, students, educators, and communities now have far more information about their schools than ever before.

2. School Funding -- We need to raise school funding up to the national average and give our kids the schools they deserve.

I fought long and hard for increased resources for our schools, and we have made significant progress in increasing funding to our schools. I am pleased that education has been moved to the top of the state's priorities during the past four years. With additional monies we have been able to build new schools and provide more up-to-date technology, textbooks, and library books. Teacher salaries have also improved somewhat; however, they are still too low to attract a sufficient number of fully trained teachers.

Clearly, while our per-pupil expenditures have risen during the past four years, they are still not at the level needed to provide our students a world-class education system. We must invest even more in day-to-day operations, which is not easy when the economy is in a downturn.

3. Smaller Classes -- We need to continue reducing class sizes.

The class size reduction program has continued to expand. In 1998, class size reduction to 20 students was funded to serve all ninth graders in two core subject areas. Additional federal money has also been made available to all districts. The first goal of the federal money is to fully reduce class size in grades kindergarten through three (K-3); after this has been accomplished class size can be further reduced in these grades or at other grades. These federal funds must supplement and not supplant the state's K-3 class size reduction program.

Smaller class sizes in fourth through twelfth grades would provide our children with even greater continuity and focused attention. However, before we attempt to expand the class size reduction program further, we need to ensure that we have enough qualified teachers and adequate facilities.


Learn more about the Superintendent of Public Instruction | Learn more about the race for Superintedent of Public Instruction

   
 

Insurance Commissioner

Chuck Quackenbush, Top 3 Priorities, 1998

1. Lower Auto Insurance Rates - He will propose a historic policy for low-income drivers.

2. Tougher Enforcement by maintaining the toughest stand against fraud and law-breaking.

3. Greater Competition in the Industry by slashing red tape and easing the regulatory burden on business.

2002 Progress Statement

(Chuck Quackenbush resigned as Insurance Commissioner after being elected to the position in 1998, therefore, no progress statement for Mr. Quackenbush has been requested. Following Mr. Quackenbush's resignation, Harry Low was appointed to the position of Insurance Commissioner; CVF did not ask for Mr. Low's top priorities for office and he is not running for election to the office of Insurance Commissioner.)


Learn more about the Insurance Commissioner | Learn more about the race for Insurance Commissioner

   
 


This page was first published on February 25, 2002
| Last updated on September 9, 2002
Copyright 2002, California Voter Foundation. All rights reserved.
www.calvoter.org
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